To Autumn

From Today in Literature

 

 

 

  On this day in 1819, twenty-five-year-old John Keats wrote to his friend, Charles Brown, to say that he was giving up poetry for journalism. This   is also the first day of autumn; four days earlier in 1819 Keats had written “To Autumn,” now one of his most popular poems, and one which many critics regard as “flawless in structure, texture, tone, and rhythm.”

 


 To Autumn

SEASON of mists and mellow fruitfulness, 

        Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run;
To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o’er-brimm’d their clammy cells.

To read the rest of this poem, click here.


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